THE LATEST….

Whoo boy…let me take it in order:

The week before Labor Day I was peacefully recovering from a triple by-pass I received Aug 4. Wednesday of that week I visited a hematologist and learned quite a bit about my long-term condition, regarding diabetes and anemia There was a small incident where my knees buckled while they were measuring my height. Nurses caught me and I spent the rest of the visit in a wheel chair. I attributed it to being overextended by the long walks in the doctor’s office. In any case there seemed no particular cause for immediate alarm.

Come the weekend, however, I began to become noticeably weaker. i fell in my house on Sunday afternoon but decided I could make it to Tuesday morning when the doctors’ offices opened to call for advice

Then, on Monday evening around 10:00 p.m., while standing in front of the recliner in my den, attempting to urinate in the bottle they had given me at the hospital, I essentially passed out and face-planted into my flat-screen television. Miraculously, I was unhurt, though the tv was shot and it took me a good thirty minutes to collect myself and call an ambulance. When I got to the hospital, it turned out the lump in my rear end, which I had taken for either a pulled muscles or a growth/tumor of some kind was a severely infected cyst. The infection had already reached my bloodstream so I was scheduled for surgery which was successfully performed on Tuesday afternoon.

After three more days in the hospital I was transferred to a rehab facility on a Friday afternoon. The actual rehab began on Monday. I told the first therapist I saw that my goal was to go home in a week. He and the nurse who was in the room at the time both got a good laugh out of that.

I went home eight days later and am doing well so far (have driven myself, gone grocery shopping, albeit with the handicap cart, done a load of laundry, etc. and worked three days). I’m still moving very slowly but, absent further setbacks, I expect to be  well-recovered in about six weeks.

When I’ll be back to normal regarding blogging and other on-line activities is still anybody’s guess. Suffice it to say I hope to become a little more engaged week-by-week.

Lastly, my apologies to everyone who follows me here for the site being down so long. It went off-line the weekend before I went back to the hospital and I didn’t have the energy to deal with it until yesterday afternoon.

It’s good to be back!

 

MY BROTHER LEFT THIS MORNING….

He had been here since Aug. 7, six days before I got out of the hospital. I want to thank him and his family for the sacrifices they made to take care of me. For various reasons no one else who would have, could have. One thing I’ve learned, if I’ve learned anything, is that the road really is long and really does have many a winding turn. And it’s an extraordinarily lucky man who can count his brother as the best human being he knows:

 

ONE WEEK AT HOME….

I came home from the hospital a week ago yesterday and things are progressing nicely. I was able to shave myself a couple of times this week, the first time sitting down, the second time standing up. I’m still using a walker as a precaution but I’m moving around a bit without it. Baby steps. I expect to resume work-at-home part time on Monday, which is also when my brother plans to return to North Carolina. I’ll have more to say about his special qualities then. I consider myself very lucky.

Meanwhile…

AND NOW FOR THE LATEST….

Short take is I’ve been in the hospital for the last two weeks and have just arrived home. They found blockage in my chest arteries that required a triple-coronary bypass. Then it took a number of days to drain the fluid from my system which I was told was considerably more than usual. It’s been an ordeal but I look forward to a full recovery.

I have good health insurance, good doctors, plenty of sick time, and a company that understands my situation. My brother is here to take care of me until I am truly back on my feet which I hope will be in a couple of weeks. Thanks to everyone for their well wishes and concerns. I’ve missed blogging as much as anything….But you know how that goes:

GOOD NEWS, LESS GOOD NEWS….

The good news is my Covid-19 test came back negative. The further good news is I can now see my doctor tomorrow concerning whatever it is I DO have (nagging cough, trouble sleeping).

The less good news is during this whole thing my legs have swollen to twice normal size and I’ve gained 19 pounds in 13 days despite limiting myself to two meals a day…So they’ll be checking on that as well. I’ll keep everyone posted on here as much as possible. I don’t think it’s out of the question I might need a hospital stay to figure out what’s going on, but hoping otherwise. I’ll know more tomorrow evening after I see the doctor!

Thanks to everyone for their concern the meanwhile! You know how I roll:

 

I’M A FOOTNOTE! (Found in the Connection: Rattling Loose End #159)

And not just any old footnote either:

Back in 2017, I wrote a post delving into the connections between the country churchyard where my parents are buried and the Band’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” which you can read (and listen to)  here.

Shortly after that, a kerfluffle broke out (yet again…o’er the years there have been many) on Greil Marcus’ website mailbag section, regarding whether the “Robert E. Lee” in the song was a reference to the General or a steamboat. People took it very seriously. Marcus used his in with the song’s composer, Robbie Robertson, to email him and ask direct. Robbie said “There’s no boat in the song.”

Next step in the process involved me writing into Marcus’s mailbag with my explanation for the possible source of the confusion (basically, the practical Yankee mind which knows Robert E. Lee was never in that part of the country vs. the romantic Southern mind which knows he is with us always and everywhere) to which Greil offered a brief but gracious response.

Now cut to this morning,very early in the A.M., with me sitting on the throne, fending off another coughing fit while I wait for my Covid-19 test results, reading the latest edition of Marcus’ most famous book Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock ‘n’ Roll Music.

It was first published in 1975, with six main chapters, one of which deals with the Band. I first read it in the spring of 1982, when I used the free week I had at the FSU music library before I officially became an alumni and would lose my lending privileges to check it out. I was suitably impressed, sorry I couldn’t keep it, loaned it to my mother so she could read the famous essay on Elvis which closes the book. She was less impressed. Her wise words were “Well, at least he took him seriously,” as if that was the most you could expect from an intellectual. I’ve got whole categories on this blog dedicated to the idea she was right but that’s another story for another time.

For now, I have to get back to this morning, when I was sitting in my bathroom, reading the 7th edition of the book and the third I own. For those who wonder why I would buy more than one edition of the book, it’s because with every new edition, Marcus updates a “Notes and Discography” section that, by now, is longer than the original book itself and is generally at least as interesting as the original text. Given endless resources, I’d own every edition, but as it is I’m satisfied to check in every decade or two.

This latest, however, is likely to be definitive because it’s from The Folio Society, a London house which specializes in bringing out collectible editions of classic works in all fields. I collect Folio when I can. I collect Mystery Train when I can. It made sense to celebrate my getting out of bankruptcy this Spring by ordering a copy which promises (and delivers) a bunch of stunning photos and greatly expanded Notes in addition to Folio’s usual slipcase and superior print craftsmanship.

Instead of reading the book straight through, I’ve been reading a chapter and then the notes associated with that chapter. So this morning I had finished reading the third chapter, which is the one on the Band, and was now reading the notes.

And right there on page 285, Folio Society Edition, 2020 I let my weary eyes wander down to a footnote* that takes up nearly half the page….and what do I see:

*”A week or so ago,” the musician Oliver Hall wrote in 2006, “[we] passed through Greenville, North Carolina, and a wonderful space of appearances called Spazzatorium gallery. Afterwards, we sat around with some locals and we sang loud, drunken harmony together: Woody Guthrie, Carter Family, some Civil War ballads I didn’t know (one in which “Jeff Davis rides a dappled grey mare, Abe Lincoln rides a mule”). When we were well in our cups, I began to sing “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” but after the first chorus, the Southerners begged me to stop. They had tears in their eyes and said the song was too painful for them to sing.” When in 2017 an online controversy broke out over whether or not, in certain live performances, Levon (Helm) himself sang not “There goes Robert E. Lee,” in other words the person, but “there goes the Robert E. Lee,” which, as denoting a Mississippi steamship, would properly be, “the Robert E. Lee,” Robbie confirmed “There is no boat in the song.” John Ross added: “For the record, every white citizen in the South who had a living memory of the Civil War believed they had caught a glimpse of Robert E. Lee, just as every white citizen thereafter has believed they’re related to him. Stoneman’s Cavalry left from my father’s back yard and ended up in my mother’s so I know a little about this. Sorry I can’t pass on what all Virgil told my uncle. But I promise you he’d be amused by this.”

Okay, so I was a little disappointed I didn’t make the Index, like my Medium partner Lew Shiner (Marcus referenced one of his short stories in the Robert Johnson Notes). And I’ll still hope for the day when some future edition reads “novelist John Ross added:”

But, as it stands, I’ve got a worthy mention in the definitive edition of the most famous and important book of rock criticism written in the twentieth century.

Coughing fits and constipation be damned.

Life ain’t all bad!

OKAY HERE’S THE SCOOP…

A week ago yesterday, having become frustrated with a week’s worth of phone-tag and various snafus regarding a cholesterol test, I visited two doctor’s offices and a lab in order to straighten out some paperwork and get retested. The paperwork got straightened out. I got retested. However, coincidentally or not (and, yes, we were all wearing masks), I woke up around 4 a.m. the next morning with a nagging, persistent cough.

I wasn’t anything I hadn’t had before so I gave it a week to improve. It didn’t so today I went back to the lab and had a Covid-19 test. I should have results in 3-7 business days. The major effect on the blog is that the coughing is making it very hard to concentrate well enough or long enough to post anything. I’ll probably need a nap when I finish this post. I’ll keep everybody posted as things develop.

In the meantime, all I can say is thank God for Al Green. It’s not many people I can listen to for four days straight when I’m too weak to fight and personally keeping Ricola in business:

UPDATE…

I just want to let everyone know that I’ve now fully migrated my site to an updated version. Everything should still work the same way but if you have problems commenting or doing anything else let me know via email at jwr1960@gmail.com and I will look into it as soon as possible.

Message to foxguy….Your last comment was the only thing lost in the migration so feel free to resubmit it (it was a link to Yes We Can Can) and I’ll respond accordingly.

Thanks as always to all who read me. You make it worthwhile!

 

 

MEMORIA…REDUX

I wrote about my mother’s one hundredth birthday here.

My father, John Howard Ross, Sr., would have been one hundred years old today. He left way more than a hundred stories so I’ll tell one of my favorites:

First, some background:

In 1993 we went to Alaska. He hadn’t been there since 1946. He was fresh out of the U.S. Army then (on a Section 8 at least according to one of the stories he told–he pretended to be crazy for a Stanford medical experiment and then pretended to cure himself in order to shave six months off his service, which had been spent fighting forest fires in the Rockies because his Conscientious Objector status had been rejected by the Draft Board after Pearl Harbor and they didn’t want him spoiling the morale in a combat unit) and spent a season panning for gold and helping paint the Hurricane Gulch Railroad Bridge.

There were a wife and child waiting back in the lower 48 so he and his partner (Hugh, whose last name has since escaped me–a shame since some of the best stories came from Dad’s time with him, though not the one about Myrtle McSpadden and the Wrestling Bear or the one that ended with “My Son, do you by chance have any Jewish blood?” a question my Dad considered the greatest compliment of his life) left with the intention of returning the following Spring.

Complications set in. My brother ended up with his maternal grandparents in Massachusetts (my father’s parents had died before he was five). The wife (my brother’s mother) ended up on the FBI’s wanted list, Top Ten to hear Dad tell it, though that may have been projection. He ended up on the wanted list himself after he kidnapped my brother from Dad’s foster parents in Tennessee. How my brother is saner than I am, I’ll never know.

Anyway, Dad got divorced, became a Carny, went on the road for over a decade, met my mother, married her and settled down. The most life advice he ever gave me all at once was when I was twelve years old and we stood in front of our house just north of Cocoa, Florida, looking up Spring Street at U.S. 1, which I understood went all the way to Maine, and he pointed back at the house and said: “Son, I’ve seen everything there is to see…and there’s nothing that compares to this.”

By then he was an ordained Baptist minister. Within a few years he had a degree from a Bible College and was, along with my mother, being appointed a Southern Baptist Home Missionary specializing in prison ministries.

By the time we made Alaska in 1993, my mother had passed away and Dad had (very reluctantly) retired from mission work, having been aged out at 69.

He wanted to travel and we took several epic journeys together, with Alaska being the most epic of all.

He drove from Florida to Montana and I flew out to meet him. His 1968 VW Microbus (with 250,000 miles on it when the trip began) broke down in small town Missouri somewhere. Engine wouldn’t start. After consulting with a local mechanic who assured him it would take at least three days to get the part he needed he said, well I have to meet my son in Montana the day after tomorrow so that won’t do.

Being my dad, he didn’t do what just anybody would have done, which was swallow and accept his fate. He prayed (which some might have done). Then he got an eight pound mallet out of his my-life-goes-with-me Microbus (I think he kept it next to the guns I’m damn sure we weren’t supposed to be transporting across international borders) and walked around to the rear end where that particular vehicle houses its engine. Then he opened up the lid and gave the engine a couple of good whacks.

Started right up.

If you’ve ever ridden the Al-Can highway in the pre-cell phone era, with its long stretches of being a hundred miles from the nearest gas station, you’ll understand why he didn’t bother to share this with me until we got home.

I was nervous enough about the guns.

Anyway it was a fine and spectacular trip with one caveat.

Ten days. No showers.

Well, actually we had one at a truck stop on the second day. After that, no showers.

The catch to going on a trip with my Dad when you had no money of your own was that you were traveling by his rules.

Those days, as has often been the case since I decided time, including the time I spent with my Dad, was more important, I had no money of my own.

I traveled by his rules.

One of his rules was there was no sense staying in motels or hotels when you had a perfectly good VW Microbus with plenty of room to stretch out in the back. Heck, Dad had been doing it for years and never been arrested once. He had a love affair with Wal-Mart–plenty of security, good lighting, open all night. Stay quiet, nobody bothers you.

The Al-Can highway was even better. Truck stops!

Once we got to Alaska it was back to shopping centers and the like. But no hotels!

Now to tell the truth I can go a week without a shower. It’s not something I ever made a habit of, but I had reason to know that I’m one of those people who can go a week without a shower and nobody’s the wiser.

As long as I don’t sweat.

Let me tell you something about Alaska in the summertime. The sun goes down for about two hours. And it gets hot as blazes.

It wasn’t Oklahoma mind you–I found out about that in 1996 when Dad and I took our last epic journey and I was still broke.

But it was bad enough.

Did I mention the 1968 VW Microbus did not come with an air conditioner?

Maybe somebody’s did. Not my Dad’s.

We spent ten days sleeping in the back, head-to-foot, me smelling his feet and him smelling mine and, hey, I didn’t mind. I always had the ability to project, to think about what a great story this would make some day–probably got that from my Dad.

But at the end of the ten rough-and-ready days there came a matter of the plane ride home.

My work schedule dictated that I couldn’t be gone much more than ten days. I had to fly back. Anchorage to Seattle to Denver to Atlanta to Tallahassee and God forbid if I missed a link anywhere.

As we drove around Anchorage on the final day I realized I had to put my foot down.

“Dad, I’m not going to spend twenty hours in airplanes and airports when I haven’t had a shower in over a week and I’ve been sweating like a hog.”

He pursed his lips–his version of biting a bullet–and nodded his head.

We would look for a truck stop.

Problem was, we weren’t on the Al-Can highway anymore. Alaska proper is not loaded with truck stops, at least not within the limits of its major cities. If there was one to be found, nobody we asked knew about it.

Next stop…the Y.M.C.A.

In 1946, when my Dad knew everything about everywhere, that wouldn’t have been a problem.

In 1993 the Y.M.C.A. had a fee. I don’t remember how much it was, but it was something like a day long membership fee and, whatever it was, it was more than Dad was willing to pay for a shower.

We drove around, looking for a cheap motel.

No go.

They were cheap…but they weren’t cheap enough. The promise of a night in bed wasn’t going to lure my Dad any more than the promise of hot running water.

A longing look.

“Dad, I’m not gettin’ on a plane without a shower or a bath. I’ll just have to eat the price of the ticket and go back with you.”

The thought of wasted money. That was the one thing bound to make him persist.

Stumped.

I didn’t put my foot down very often. I was known for not putting my foot down, so when I did, he knew I meant it.

Stumped.

Stumped, stumped, stumped.

For a pretty good little while.

But not forever.

As we drove aimlessly on–his Scottish soul set on a price, mine set on a result–hopelessly deadlocked, until the answer at last arrived…in the form of a sign pointing to a campground.

$19.95 a night.

Showers included!

If we had seen it first, he would have rejected it out of hand.

Since we saw it last it was just what the doctor ordered if not an explicit Answer to Prayer.

We pulled in, we paid the fee, we parked.

And I know you forgot there was one by now but….

Therein lies the story.

I kept waiting for the catch, but none appeared.

Dad paid the fee. We parked. We hooked into whatever you hook into in those places.

There were copious signs pointing to the showers.

You couldn’t miss them.

All the hard battles had been fought. Heck, now that we were here, Dad had decided a shower might not be such a bad thing after all.

He’d take his right after I took mine.

We didn’t want to leave the vehicle unattended and sure didn’t want to have to keep track of the keys while we were both in the shower.

He knew about these places.

Keep that in mind.

We had each been given a towel and washrag. Free with the price of admission. We had been told that soap was available in the shower room.

It seemed I had everything I needed.

I headed for the shower room.

With my shoes on.

And then the adventures began.

It was mid-to-late afternoon by then, probably around 4:00. Weirdly, given that we were in the Land of the Midnight Sun, I remember the shadows being long.

Not so long I couldn’t see. The place was empty and the sunlight was shining through the high windows of the shower room at the Kamanawanalaya Campground** in Anchorage, Alaska. The interior lights were shining.

I could plainly see that most the floor was standing in about three inches of water.

I hiked back to the Micro-bus and took off my shoes and socks and pitched them into the back.

“Lotta water on the floor,” I said.

My Dad looked puzzled and then nodded. No comment.

It had been an edgy day. We weren’t on the easiest of terms.

I hiked back to the shower room, still dressed except for my shoes and socks.

When I got there it was still empty and the water was still covering most of the floor. I banished all thoughts of foot fungus, reminded myself I was the one who had pushed for this, and waded in.

There was a row of sinks to my left and toilets to my right. Above the sinks was a long shelf and mirror that ran the length.

Beyond that were a set of four shower stalls separated by single-width brick partitions painted vomit yellow, each stall covered by a curtain that fell to the height of a grown man’s knees. Call it Block A.

On the back wall, well off to my right were a matching set of four more stalls. Call it Block B.

In no stall of either Block was there anything like a step-over to block the water at the bottom from flooding out. Whatever didn’t go down the drain in the shower ended up on the floor of the main room.

Hence the flood. All the drains were inside the showers, but there was nothing to prevent most of the water from flowing out onto the main floor, where there were no drains.

Once I recognized that, I felt a bit more at ease. I was sure I knew the worst of it.

The water level seeming a bit less toward the back there, I headed for the back wall. Remember now: Block A, Left Wall; Block B, Back Wall. Got it? You’ll want to keep the geography in mind.

I had left my clothes and glasses on the shelf near Block A. When I reached Block B, I chose the third stall. I looked around for a bar of soap and there was none, so I went wandering around for a bit and found one next to the sinks. To this day I wonder if it was really anyone from the campground who left it there.

Once I had waded back to Block B, Stall 3, soap, towel and washrag now safely procured, I proceeded to place myself under the shower head and reached up and turned the nozzle.

A spray of water along the lines of what might be expected from a Force 3 Hurricane immediately shot out of the spout of Block A, Stall 1, thirty feet away, the stall closest to my casually strewn clothes, resting on the shelf above the row of sinks. The nozzle had evidently been pointed at the inner wall, because the stream of water, bounced off that wall, blew past the knee-length curtain, which flew up to head-height to let the stream pass and soak my clothes.

I got the nozzle of Block B, Stall 3 turned off as quick as a man in my now brain-dead condition could.

Then I said a few choice words. Then I just stood and stared for a while.

Then, slowly, very-y-y-y slowly, I emerged from what I would soon learn to think of as “my” stall.

I described everything above as it happened, but, believe me, it took longer than a few seconds for me to piece together exactly what had happened.

Once I did I began to wonder if the place came with instructions.

Here’s the weird thing. It did!

On the wall between Block A and Block B was a rather nondescript chart, designed as if it were meant to be ignored, like a No Swimming sign in a place that, after all, held no more than six inches of water. If one waded back to the shelf where one’s clothes–and glasses–were, and if one could find something dry to clean the water off one’s lenses, (no small task) and then waded over to the chart, one could find, and barely read, the designations for which shower nozzles went with which shower stalls.

Honestly, it seemed a relief at the time.

It took some doing, memorizing the chart sufficiently well to learn that if I went to Block A, Stall 2, and turned on the nozzle there, water would flow in Block B, Stall 3, where I was still set up and all ready to go!

Reader I went there. I went to Block A, Stall 2, and with only a moment’s hesitation, turned the nozzle. And I was rewarded…

With another Hurricane 3 blast….

From Block B, Stall 1.

After watching the water blow across the floor for a bit–who knows how long–I slowly, wearily, tuned off the nozzle in Block A, Stall 2.

So much for the Chart.

You know the rest of the story, though even I couldn’t tell you how long it took for me to conduct the trial-and-error experiments that led me, at last, to whichever Block and Stall actually turned on the nozzle in Block B, Stall 3.

Yes, I know I could have rushed over and retrieved my towel, washrag, and soap from Block B, Stall 3 and relocated, adjusted the nozzle in Block B, Stall 1, and gotten the job done in a shorter time.

But my Scottish soul had come too far and suffered too long for me to settle for that. Block B, Stall 3 it was to be, else I would bathe in the fungus-filled water collected on the shower room floor of the Kamanawanalaya Campground in Anchorage, Alaska.

Long story short, I showered, I sort of dried myself off (all the adventurous paths hurricane force water was taking in that place, you don’t really think there was a dry towel left now do you?). I dressed, all but my soaked undershorts. I left my soaked towel and washrag in the shower room.

I took another shot at drying off my glasses.

I walked, clean except for the grass clippings sticking to the damp soles of my bare feet, back to the VW Microbus, feeling like a man who had escaped Dante’s Inferno, wondering if Noah had gotten it backwards, lived through a fire and promised it would be the water next time.

I didn’t care then, and don’t care now, that the Hurricane 3 water pressure, once I finally stood under it, nearly scalded my skin, or that I point blank refused to go in to the individual stalls and at least point the nozzles, which all seemed to have been set at right angles to the floor, toward the drains that existed right beneath them and nowhere else.

Let others suffer as I had suffered.

I was in a very Old Testament mood when I reached home base and was met by my father with the words:

“Well I was about to send out a search party.”

I didn’t say a word. I couldn’t. I took the microbus keys from him, noted that he had taken off his shoes and socks and crawled into the front seat and threw my head back.

Off he strode and I was glad to see the back of him.

One word from me and we might have come to blows.

I had taken a vow of nonviolence when I was nine years old. If was going to break it, I didn’t want to break it going after my old man.

By then, the shadows had surely grown long, and not only in my mind.

And what happened after?

Suffice it to say, he was gone for a long time.

I did not consider sending a search party.

I was very interested in what his reaction would be when he returned.

And when, after a very long time, he did return, his reaction was thus.

He shook his head despairingly and said:

“John, I believe that place must have been designed by a pure genius, because no ordinary man could have done it.”

I collapsed with laughter. The anger and petulance of the long day vanished.

I laughed the way I laughed at my first Marx Brothers movie–the one my Dad told me to watch.

And I always liked that he understood why I hadn’t warned him.

To this day, I meet people who are convinced they’ve had more fun than me in this life.

All I can do is smile and think.

Sadly, no.

Because, remember, that’s just one story, and there were way more than a hundred.

Thanks Dad. Thanks for all of it. Let all the world say what they may. I know how it really was, and if God was only going to make one of you, I’ll never be more grateful for anything than that he made me your son.

(NOTE: My Dad was sucker-punched in a high school fight, knocked unconscious. Though he otherwise recovered, he lost his ear for music. The rest of his life, the only music he ever really heard was my mother’s singing voice and early New Orleans jazz. I don’t have the means of transferring the one tape I have of my mother to a computer format. Dad’s favorite musician will have to do.)

**No, Turtles’ fans, it wasn’t really called Kamanawanalya Campground. But it should have been!

JUST FOR FUN (Something I NEVER Do…)

There’s evidently a meme going around (or perhaps Terry Teachout is trying to start one) called Seven Albums to Know Me By….

I just picked the first seven that came to mind…but I bet if I thought about it a long-g-g-g-g time, it wouldn’t look much different:

The Impressions The Vintage Years (1958-72, released 1977)

The greatest album ever assembled and the history of Black America from the late 50’s to today…in 28 impeccable sides.

The Go-Go’s Talk Show (1984)

Well, it did save my life. Funny: Beauty and the Beat, which I’ve listened to far more often, wouldn’t tell you a thing about me. Art is funny that way.

Elvis Presley From Elvis in Memphis (1969)

Not even really the cream of the greatest vocal sessions ever recorded. But programmed as its own kind of perfection…and “Long Black Limousine” carries E’s you-lookin’-at-me-lookin’-at-me-lookin’-at-you-lookin’-at-me ethos, evident as far back as the Sun sessions, to its natural conclusion. Living in two minds and observing one’s self from afar–these things I am in touch with.

The Persuasions: Chirpin’ (1977)

The greatest album cover. The music? No words. Nothing defines you quite like that which leaves you speechless.

Al Green The Belle Album (1977)

He brought me safe thus far…through many drunken country bars.

My spiritual autobiography even though I’ve never been near a drunken country bar. Art being funny again.

The Four Seasons Story (1962-70, released 1975)

Absurdist high harmonies and drums loud enough to lock the world out. If you know that much about me, you know me very well. There have been greater collections on CD, but this was there when I was in survival mode.

The Byrds Greatest Hits (1965-66, released 1967)

If not for this…who knows about the rest?

(If seven had been ten: Shangri-Las ’65, War Greatest Hits, Dusty in Memphis).

…and now back to the Democratic Primary Season! bwahahahahahahahahaha!