DEVIL’S DAUGHTER (Anita Pallenberg, R.I.P.)

Say what you want, but as muses go she had unique power. When she was through with Brian Jones (circa 1967), he was through with himself. When she was through with Keith Richards (circa 1980), the only question left was not whether he would make any more inspired music (he didn’t) but who would get the last laugh in hell.

I know the answer, but, as usual, am sworn to secrecy (made my deal with God…He’s the really strict one).

It’s not all that hard to guess, though. Not really.

She might not be resting in peace tonight…but I have it on good authority she got what she wanted. How many of us can say that?

LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS ALBUM COVERS (Paean #8: The Rolling Stones–Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass), US, 1966)

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The Stones are everywhere this primary season. Closing Donald Trump’s road show is the least of it. I woke up one day this week and somebody (I think it was MSNBC but don’t hold me to it, I’ve been going to sleep with the TV on a lot and sometimes the waking and dreaming are hard enough to keep track of without getting all technical about purely three dimensional details), was using the opening and closing tracks of Exile on Main Street for bumper music.

The next evening it was “Miss You.” Maybe on C-Span or Fox. Again, I lost track.

Tomorrow, who knows?

But does anybody still want to take a look at the set of problems facing us and the choice of candidates who will lead us boldly into the future and still argue Satan’s not, as one of the minor prophets had it, laughing with delight?

The cover of the first hits package released by the Laughing One’s favorite band, the first and last to stake their claim so entirely on being that before anything else that they were that (say from roughly 1965 to 1972) or nothing (say, ever since), was a kind of perfect statement all on its own.

It said most of what there was to say without any reference at all to the great full page photos that came with the original vinyl package or the stripped down assault of the actual music:

“We may have been born clodhoppers but we’ve now made every deal that needs to be made and we’re here to burn down your cornfield and there’s nothing you can do about it!

Tom Wolfe’s famous epigram (“The Beatles want to hold your hand, but the Stones want to burn down your town.” yaddah, yaddah, yaddah) didn’t cover the half of it. The Stones were more like agents from the future we’re now living in than the James boys fresh off their break from Captain Quantrill. Not undercover mind you–what could possibly be more obvious than that picture up there–just messengers.

That’s what I always liked about them, once I started working my way backward through rock and roll history from the late seventies and turned this one up on one of my first trips to the panhandle’s only record Co-op (say 1979 or 80).

They were were so refreshingly up-front. Hey, it’s 1966 and things seem a little nervy. But it’s about to get way-y-y-y-y worse. Soon you’ll be stumbling around in the dark and become so lost that most of you will live to see P.T. Barnum rise from the grave and storm the gates. And you can bet he’ll use us for exit music!

As a collection covering a period that had its share of musical rough patches, High Tide is just about perfect. It contextualizes both the half-successful “As Tears Go By” (which was a big hit despite Mick Jagger’s bound-to-be-awkward attempt at faking sentimentality), and their version of “Not Fade Away,” where Jagger sounds even clumsier chasing Buddy Holly than he did chasing Howlin’ Wolf on High Tide‘s UK-version cover of “Little Red Rooster”–by the sixties, it was much odder to sound like you’d never seen a Cadilllac than like you’d never seen a rooster.

Context is everything, too. Those two neither-here-nor-there tracks are the only side trips on an otherwise perfect collection and they don’t really take you so far from the rubber-burning highway they were running down at full speed that they amount to anything more than bathroom breaks.

Here, better than anywhere else, you can understand why Nik Cohn thought it would be perfect for the Stones to die-before-thirty in a plane crash.

That they spent the next six years mounting ever higher is still shocking.

And it’s even more shocking that the mounting was all in the music.

Purely image-wise, they never beat that photo.

Come on, how could they?

They stuck Brian Jones up front, like nobody could possibly imagine he belonged anywhere else.

They stood on rocks.

At low tide.

They stared down every other bunch of punks who ever posed for an album cover and  made it clear that all the others would be both inevitably compared to them…and found wanting.

Whatever deal you think you made with the Laughing One, they seemed to say, you can walk away from it. We can’t. Because we’ve cancelled all the bets. Ours and yours.

Brian Jones was dead within three years. The rest were pod people within five years after that. We live in the world left behind.

Kinda’ sucks for us.

But, boy, while it lasted….

THE KID WHO WENT EVERYWHERE…AND TOOK US ALONG FOR THE RIDE (Kevin Corcoran, R.I.P.)

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Kevin Corcoran was a particular kind of child star, the kind who was entrusted with translating the dream life of the the last several generations of children who got to grow up before the concept of childhood was dumped over the side for the sake of “progress.”

Not a bad job, though I bet it was a lot harder than he made it look.

He got to fight pirates and Indians, swing with monkeys, run off to join the circus, beat drums at Shiloh and, most importantly, constantly annoy older people, especially older brothers. He got to do everything all us other boys-next-door could possibly dream of getting away with and most of what we couldn’t hope to get away with and he did it all supremely well. If we couldn’t run with great danes on south sea islands and throw commodore’s hats in the ocean ourselves, I don’t think too many of us could have wished for a better stand-in.

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And while I suppose there were better kid actors, it’s worth noting that he held his own with the top ranks, including Hayley Mills and Tommy Kirk, my own choices for the finest kid actors of the post-war era, at the top of their respective games (though I do wish this kid had gotten more chances).

Kevin Corcoran died of cancer last week at the age of sixty-six. His best movies, Pollyanna, Old Yeller, Swiss Family Robinson, were all great and all better for his being in them. I don’t know if they’ll be watched forever. But I know I wouldn’t count a world where they’re forgotten as one that was much worth living in.

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As a additional note: Tommy Kirk, who had by far the hardest life, is now the only surviving cast member of Swiss Family Robinson, the one and only movie family I ever wished I was part of. This is as likely as Brian Jones living to be the only surviving member of the Rolling Stones. As I’ve mentioned before: Take any bet you want. Just remember that Time is a master at perverting even the surest odds.

And as a final note: Yes I’m proud of hosting what I’m pretty sure is the only blog where Rosanna Arquette’s extremely hot crotch and Moochie’s place in the lives of a generation can be celebrated, without irony, in the same week. I really do try folks.

RUNNING DOWN THE ROAD WITH THE SKYDOG (Why I Still Need Rock and Roll: Session #13)

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Listen to just about any musical genius who lived ninety miles an hour and found death before it could find them and it’s easy to hear them chasing what they caught.

It’s a long list: Robert Johnson, Hank Williams, Charlie Parker, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Keith Moon, Kurt Cobain. All carried deep desperation or (assuming the qualities can ever be disentangled) fatalism in their bones. They couldn’t have kept the devil’s laughter from being an essential part of how they sang or played if they had wanted to…which they wouldn’t have.

Listening to seven hours of Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective this week, four of them on the annual Florida-Alabama-Georgia loop that carries me past my mother’s graveside, what I heard was a man who had absorbed and mastered everything from Steve Cropper-style studio concision to deep, biting blues to epic guitar god soloing to do Clapton or Hendrix proud…and not only sounded like his own man on every note, but like he had all the time in the world.

He might have been the only live-fast-die-young icon who actually died on a motorcycle, but unlike everybody else I just listed, it’s easy to hear any piece of music he ever touched, from lightest brush…

to firm embrace…

to death-grip…

…and imagine him living another fifty years if he had only lived another day.

Thanks Duane.

When I make that annual pilgrimage in the future, I won’t have to worry anymore about which music to ride along with.