BATTLE OF THE BANDS….ER, MAKE THAT “BATTLE OF THE BIG-HAIRED SEVENTIES’ ERA POP STARS, AT LEAST ONE OF WHICH HAD A SUSPICIOUSLY FLIMSY RELATIONSHIP TO THE PLANET EARTH !” (Found in the Connection: Rattling Loose End #74)

Steven Rubio has a post today on pop songs that become indelibly linked with a movie scene (you can find Renee Zellwegger’s fabulous lip sync of a cover version of Eric Carmen’s “All By Myself” at the beginning of Bridget Jones’s Diary if you follow the link).

Great as Renee is, I can’t ever quite link “All By Myself” to anything but the summer of 1977 when, right in the middle of two summer weeks at my brother’s house that were otherwise among the happiest days of my life, I played my newly acquired 45 of Carmen’s record on the stereo nobody used except when I was visiting. (To tell the truth, I had bought the 45 for “Never Gonna Fall In Love Again,” which was on the flip-side of one of those Golden Oldie two-fers. The two “oldies” had, respectively, entered the charts all of eighteen and fourteen months previously. As I’ve mentioned before, Pop Time moved much, much faster then.)

It was the middle of the afternoon and I was all alone in the house (a big two-story job in what came to be called the “Research Triangle” in North Carolina–my brother and his wife still live there). I had a connection to “All By Myself” that day, the first time I ever dropped a needle on it, that I never had with it, or any other record, before that day, and, thankfully, never had again.

I say thankfully, because, while nothing happens in a vacuum, hearing the record, and, at sixteen, relating to it a little too closely, tipped me over into a series of bouts of depression that kept me on the thin edge of suicide until seven years later, when, under another very particular set of circumstances which I’ll probably write about some day, hearing the Go-Go’s’ “Beneath the Blue Sky” drove the dark clouds away mysteriously, instantaneously and for good.

What I mean to say is, even with three decades of rationality and restored sanity to serve as a defensive barrier, I can never really hear “All By Myself” casually, not even when Renee Zellweger is lip-syncing a cover version.

So, having a little time on my hands this afternoon, I went off on a slight tangent, which involved a realization that I could finally access Carmen’s original version of my favorite composition of his, which I knew only through Shaun Cassidy’s version, through this eternally wonderful and surprising new device called YouTube!

Funny enough, Shaun Cassidy records written by Eric Carmen (the other big one was the equally luminous “Hey Deanie”) more than occasionally helped me keep my equilibrium through the exceptionally dark days of 1978 and ’79. I don’t know if that qualifies as Irony. Suffice it to say I could never be ashamed of my taste in those days. It would be the same as being ashamed of surviving.

So, in more or less ascending order, (not necessarily the order in which I found them)….

Thanks Eric.

I think.

And I’m really glad this didn’t lead me all the way into an exposition of my theory of beautiful aliens surely passing among us based on my understanding of the way Shaun Cassidy and Debbie Harry did or did not pronounce the word “guitar” on various of their recordings.

That could have been stressful.

I mean, who knows if those creatures are still friendly?

(PUBLIC WARNING: If you follow the above links, please beware of the addictive nature of the Raspberries and Badfinger videos that continually pop up on the right of your screen. Should you choose to access these videos, this blog cannot be held legally or morally responsible for what happens to the rest of your day!)

MY VERY FIRST OFFICIAL CD REVIEW (The Paley Brothers Help Me Define How I Really Feel About Certain Things…Or Something Like That)

The Paley Brothers: The Complete Recordings

(NOTE: The Paley Brothers were a sibling harmony duo who released an album and a few singles at the height of the Do It Yourself Punk/New Wave moment in the late seventies. Their complete recordings, including some previously unissued and live tracks are now available. This is the first time I’ve ever formally reviewed a CD. Somebody was kind enough to send me a review copy so, of course, since I was obligated to write about it, it fell into that most difficult of categories–Liked-it-didn’t-love-it-even-though-I-really-wanted-to. Still, thinking about it like a “reviewer” provided an interesting experience. Unlike books or movies, which require a certain level of engagement, music can and should be experienced both deeply and casually. Hence I tried on a mix of close attention and having it on in the background over the course of several weeks. It never really grabbed me…but it did leave me with a few things to say.)

The Paley Brothers were one of those “can’t miss” acts who missed. They were slated Power Pop–a genre that never quite seemed to live up to its potential in any case–but I hear as much Retro (along the lines of Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids) as anything. As much Fifties as Sixties in other words.

That’s hardly a bad thing. The Paleys were certainly skilled as both writers and singers–enough that I can readily understand the cult that’s developed around these recordings even if I can’t quite join it.

I’m left on the outside by, among other things, my aversion to half-formulas.

Pop, I hear, in every second.

Power? Not so much. And, unfortunately, whatever the marketing label, all first class Pop needs it, a lesson the DIY brand the Paleys specialized in failed to learn in general.

Having said all that, I can’t deny that these recordings are quite good as knockoffs (or that I have a fondness for knockoffs). And the Brothers certainly had pedigree, or, at very least, connections. They recorded most of these sides in either the Beach Boys’ own Brother Studios or Ardent Studios in Memphis (home of Power Pop avatars, Big Star).

You can read those kind of details in the very engaging liner notes which are actually the best thing about this package. But in the end, all that information does is re-emphasize how the best Power Pop (or Retro) bands always added a little something (if not a whole lotta something). And it was that extra something–not the imitative elements–that made the Raspberries or Badfinger or Cheap Trick or Big Star or, yes, I insist, Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids–special.

The Paleys, on the other hand, do some perfect imitations (especially of the Everly Brothers and late period Beach Boys, though on “Too Good to Be True,” they sneak in a Bobby Fuller Four Vibe that is perfect in every respect except for their keeping their distance in a way Fuller never would have imagined even when he was throwing one of his occasional change-ups), or, sometimes, perfect-imitations-of-imitations like a live cover of Tommy Roe’s “Sheila” which itself was a top-notch Buddy Holly homage.

To be fair, the Paleys did do a bit of anticipating as well. But it was of future Retro acts like Shaun Cassidy (who they would end up touring with) and the Stray Cats (1979’s “She’s Eighteen Tonight” could be a template for that band’s entire career). And those acts would be just that little bit better–or maybe just that little bit more focused–that is so often the difference between hitting and missing.

I do hear a lot of passion in the Paleys music, especially the vocals. But in the end, their records were always let down by something. Strange to say, given that Andy Paley went on to become a big-time producer, but there are several sides here I can imagine taking off if only a little more care or imagination had been applied to some particular element of studio-craft: “You’re the Best” and “Runnin’ In the Rain” have great melodies and fine vocals but are built around seriously undercooked arrangements (a common problem with the entire DIY movement, actually, given that arrangements are the life-blood of all great Pop) while “Magic Power” which does have a strong arrangement is dragged down by an uncharacteristically misguided lead vocal.

And–background or foreground–so it goes with this entire record and with my first exposure to the Paley Brothers. They chased after so many bits of other people’s genius that they never quite found their own.

Granted, they wore their influences so proudly on their sleeves that it amounted to a kind of integrity. But it also added up to a sound with no strong central focus. That’s what separates them from bands like the Raspberries or Badfinger, who had hits by getting within shouting distance of the Beatles and the Beach Boys. And I suspect it’s the missing ingredient, as well, that prevented them from producing a single transcendent track after the manner of Starz’ “Cherry Baby” or Sniff N’ the Tears’ “Driver’s Seat”, which at least scraped the Top 40 by getting within shouting distance of the Raspberries.

So I guess at bottom I can hear how something bigger might have happened for the Paleys with a small twist of fate here or there.

But, even on their magnum opus “Can You Come Out and Play,” I can also hear why it didn’t.

And in this latter, there is a certain poignance and even relevance.

If “Can You Come Out and Play” had as much vocal impact on Shaun Cassidy as I suspect, then that’s reason enough for the Paleys’ recordings–and this package–to exist. I mean, you can take my Sinatra records (well, Frank’s anyway) and do with them what you will, but you’ll have to pry “That’s Rock and Roll” and “Hey Deanie” from my cold dead fingers.

The heartfelt liner-note tribute from Seymour Stein, the Sire Records label head who signed the Paleys, believed in them and stood by them as long as possible, shows how much good will and real respect they generated.

There is some real love for them there and in a lot of the quotes from other big-timers as well–not to mention a lot of positive-to-rave reviews in the here and now.

They clearly had some sort of magic.

I only wish I could honestly say it translated to my own ears.