QUIET MIRACLE, DEEP MIRACLE (Pete Moore, R.I.P.)

Sometimes one gets by me. Pete Moore (second from the left), passed away last November on his 78th birthday.

With his childhood friends, Ronnie White and Smokey Robinson, he formed one of the greatest vocal groups of the twentieth century (Bobby Rogers and his cousin, Claudette (soon to be Mrs.) Robinson rounded out the group).

Moore was a fabulous bass singer, the foundation of all deep harmony groups, especially in the soul tradition.

But he was more than that. Smokey Robinson, one of popular music’s greatest arrangers, was also the hardest working man at Motown in the sixties. In addition to leading, writing for and producing his own group, plus the usual heavy touring and television load, he was competing with Holland-Dozier-Holland to see who would cut hits with the remaining cream of the label’s crop.

Meanwhile he entrusted Moore with the background arrangements on their own group’s records–and the results were both unique in form (when Smokey developed his signature technique of dropping off the end of a key line, which gave many of his greatest records an extra layer of quiet desperation and allowed him to fray his near-falsetto range for startling emotional effects without having to make awkward swoops back to the melody before drawing a breath…it was Moore’s arrangements that filled the empty space, and, more often than not, heightened the drama) and among the supreme achievements of group harmony.

Later on, when Smokey left, Moore–who had co-written plenty of the classic-era hits (including the one above)–also co-wrote a number of the tracks that kept the group relevant for most of the seventies, including “Love Machine.”

Not that he forgot how to sing bass…

I have it on my usual good authority that Miracles never die. They just move on.

Four months?

Bet he’s got a helluva group together by now….

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