The Salt Lake City reports that appeared on the morning of the 6th were generally discredited in New York and Washington. The War Department cautioned against believing them. Congress discussed the matter and concluded by assigning the whole affair to the panic of a demoralized scout who had fled in the heat of battle. The Senate passed a resolution, however, requesting information from the President, and perhaps not unrelatedly gave favorable treatment to the pending bill for the transfer of responsibility for Indian affairs from the Interior to the War Department.

A reporter for the New York Herald sought out Generals Sherman and Sheridan, both of whom were in Philadelphia. Sheridan declared that the news had arrived by a very circuitous route and had come “without any marks of credence.” Sherman was in the midst of pointing out to the correspondent that the absence of any official report from the field opened the rumors to serious question when an aide handed him a note. It was the official confirmation from the field.

(Custer and the Great Controversy, Robert Utley, 1961)

Having shaken their readers with the biggest news break of the year [i.e., the destruction of Custer’s command], the newspapers eagerly devoted column after column to reports arriving from the frontier. The wildest rumors and grossest fabrications were printed and avidly read by a fascinated public. From the papers they found their way into popular literature, into folklore, and into history. Almost every myth of the Little Bighorn that one finds today masquerading as history may be found also in the press accounts of July 1876.

(Custer, Utley, op cit)

CONFESSION: I’ve heard Donald Trump compared to a lot of historical figures in the last two and half years, by himself and countless other. ‘I’ve compared him to a few people myself. Until I read this, it hadn’t occurred to me to compare him to Sitting Bull. Hmmmm….

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