ONLY THE NAMES CHANGE….A WORD ON THE “ELECTION” (Great Quotations)

Billy Wilder once told an interviewer that, of all the people he had known in Hollywood (which was practically everyone), the two people he was asked most about, by far, were Marilyn Monroe and Raymond Chandler.

Marilyn needs no explanation.

Why Raymond Chandler?

Maybe because he was forever saying things like this:

The FBI is a bunch of overpublicized characters, Hoover himself being a first rate publicity hound. All secret police forces come to the same end. I’ll bet the s.o.b. has a dossier on everybody who could do him damage. The FBI throws up such a smoke screen that they make the public forget all the tough ones they never broke. Sometimes I wonder if they ever did break a really tough one.

(Raymond Chandler, Letter to James Fox, Jan. 18, 1954, from Raymond Chandler: A Biography, Tom Hiney, Grove Press, 1997, p 181)

That was from the days before the Security State was quite so firmly entrenched.

Gee, wonder how he’d feel this week, when James Comey convinced all the people who, back in July, were telling themselves things really had changed, that nothing has changed,  and all the people who, back in July, were telling themselves that nothing had changed, that….hey, maybe things have changed!

To those who dare to put their trust in secret police forces on the days they bring “good” news…please, I beg you….come back to the light and grow old with me.

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THE SHOCK OF THE NEW…BROOKLYN, NEW YORK: 1962 (Great Quotations)

In 1962 I was 18 with the hits “Halfway to Paradise” and “Bless You” under my belt. I’ll never forget doing a big “Murray the K” show at the Brooklyn Fox Theater….Before the show Murray called the artists together and said that a new group, The 4 Seasons, would be closing the show with the song “Sherry.” “Make sure,” he said, “that you give them a nice welcome.” I had never heard of the group or the song. When the moment arrived, I was in the wings, alongside Smokey Robinson and Jackie Wilson. I had never seen an audience respond like that, and I don’t think I ever have since. The stomping almost took the balcony down. The Seasons destroyed the theater in one song.

Tony Orlando

(Source: Liner notes for Jersey Beat….The Music of Frankie Valli and the 4 Seasons, Rhino Records, 2007)

IN THIS EVER CHANGING WORLD IN WHICH WE LIVE IN, AT LEAST ONE THING HAS REMAINED THE SAME (Great Quotations)

Because, so far as I know, this has not changed…

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“The only creature hurt in making our picture was a press agent who got in the way of a posse. Fortunately, there’s no society for the prevention of cruelty to press agents.” (John Ford, responding to whether any horses were injured during the filming of Stagecoach)

(Source: John Ford Interviews, 2001, Ed. Gerald Peary, original interview conducted by Michel Mok, 1939)

 

NOT SUCH A FOOL (Great Quotations)

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(Eddie Cochran and Sharon Sheeley. At eighteen, Sheeley was the first solo female songwriter to write a #1 record for the Billboard Pop Chart. (It was Ricky Nelson’s “Poor Little Fool.” She stalled her car in front of his house and, when he came out to help her, convinced him she was on her way to deliver the song to Elvis and would he like to hear it first?) She was riding next to Cochran–by some accounts as his fiance–in England, when he was killed in a car crash in April, 1960. After recovering from severe injuries herself, she teamed with Jackie DeShannon to form the first (and, frankly, only**) successful all-female songwriting team in the history of American music. You wonder why I keep chipping away at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Because it’s a worthwhile institution overall and I cling to the hope that, some day, if enough small voices do the same, they’ll get it right, especially where women and secret heroes are concerned.)

This is from Joel Selvin’s obituary for Sheeley, (quoted in Real Life Rock, Greil Marcus, 2015, originally printed at Salon.com June 10, 2002):

“Although Sheeley lived 42 more years, she never got over Eddie,” writes Selvin, author of “Ricky Nelson: Idol for a Generation” and the unforgiving “Summer of Love.” “She was never able to stay with another man for long. Cochran loomed over her life. She will be buried in a plot next to him.”

“‘Poor Little Fool’ provided a modest annual stipend,” Selvin concluded. “She lived quietly with her grown son, across the street from her sister. She entertained visitors with hilarious anecdotes and reminiscences, peppered with sly humor and innuendo. Sheeley was the original Riot Grrrl, even if those in her debt never knew. One young music business secretary sighed to Sheeley about Cochran’s good looks a few years ago. ‘Honey,’ Sheeley said, ‘you should have seen him when he was breathing.’”

(“Somethin’ Else” was co-written by Sheeley and Bob Cochran, Eddie’s brother. I’ll have a good deal more to say about her ability to write from a rather different, specifically male, perspective in an upcoming post.)

(**In the Tin Pan Alley, Brill Building, song-mill sense, and I’ll just add that Sheeley and DeShannon did so as true free-lancers, without that kind of support system.)

[NOTE: This life-affirming post was in lieu of a negativity-fueled rant I had practically written in my head concerning the crit-illuminati wetting themselves celebrating the new Star Wars’ movie’s “diversity” because they’ve added Stepin Fetchit and Katniss Everdeen to the franchise. I don’t want anybody coming around here trying to collect any Pollyanna dues from me for at least a year.]

ONE MORE DEBT I WON’T GET TO PAY IN THIS LIFE…(Great Quotations)

“Fully 95 percent of the stuff I learned about recording, I learned in the studio with Joe South.”

(Source: Emory Gordy, Jr., quoted in “Joe South: Down In the Boondocks” American Songwriter, March/April 2007)

You never know exactly what you owe or exactly who you owe it to. Some times you get to find out a little.

Though he played with practically everybody (Elvis for starters) and produced more than a few, Emory Gordy, Jr. is most famous these days for being Patty Loveless’ husband and long-time producer. Anybody who doesn’t already know how I feel about Ms. Loveless can type her name in the search button in the upper right hand corner and find out quick enough. Anybody who wants to know how I feel about Joe South can go here for at least a small taste.

And now there’s a solid link between them. Gee, and I already thought I owed Joe a lot.

There are any number of artists’ songbooks I’d like to see Patty have a go at (including very particularly Bob Dylan and Jagger/Richards…she’s already got a pretty fine track record with Hank Williams, though extending it would be another nice idea).

But after encountering that quote above, I just realized that, with apologies to Tom T. Hall, I’d give a hundred dollars to hear her sing this just once:

 

THE SHOCK OF THE NEW…LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND: 1961 (Great Quotations)

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“The Silver Beatles left Liverpool on August 16.

“They returned as the Beatles, and on December 27 killed the crowd at Liverpool’s Litherland Town Hall–the Beatle date generally held as witnessing the first flash of real riot: Beatlemania, ground zero. ‘Their music was raw,’ Allan Williams writes, ‘almost savage, compulsive, and it knocked the Merseyside kids sideways….The bouncers on duty on the door thought a riot had broken out and went rushing in to stop the trouble.'”

(Source: Magic Circles: The Beatles in Dream and Memory, Devin McKinney, 2003)

[NOTE: I’m still trying to get my mind around McKinney’s book which is one of the most deeply mixed bags I’ve ever encountered. I may end up taking it on in bits and pieces rather than attempting a whole review….I’ll keep plugging away.)]

HISTORY IN THE MAKING…LOS ANGELES, 1979 (Great Quotations)

Starting to contemplate a long post on my history with the Go-Go’s, so here’s a teaser:

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“They were rehearsing a couple of times a month. I said ‘Guys, you gotta rehearse like four or five times a week if you want to make this happen.'”

(Gina Schock, drummer to the gods, recalling her first meeting with the Go-Go’s. Source: VH1 Behind the Music–The Go-Go’s)

Thirty-two months later (with Kathy Valentine having replaced Margot Olavarria [far right]), the Go-Go’s were the first self-contained, all-female band in the history of popular music to have the #1 album in Billboard.

As of this date, they are also the last.

Like I always say, when there’s only one of something, there’s usually a reason….like maybe the unusual ability to communicate angst as joy:

 

THE SHOCK OF THE NEW….NEW YORK CITY: 1956 (Great Quotations)

“When I heard his voice….I moved in and listened.”

Arlene Smith, on hearing thirteen-year-old Frankie Lymon for the first time on Alan Freed’s New York radio show.

(A nice sequel to Richard Barrett hearing Arlene, which I posted about here…quote is also from the linked interview)

 

 

THE SHOCK OF THE NEW….NEW YORK CITY: CIRCA, 1957 (Great Quotations)

“He just stood there with his mouth open.”

The Chantels’ Arlene Smith, on the reaction of record man Richard Barrett (who was producer/label owner George Goldner’s talent scout/right hand man) when–at fifteen and on her way to creating an entirely new ethos in American culture–she auditioned for him on the streets of New York.

I’ll be pursuing this a bit in the next few days (Goldner, Smith, the Record Biz, that is) when I get back to some problems I had with Greil Marcus’ The History of Rock ‘N’ Roll in Ten Songs.

In the meantime, I highly recommend the lengthy interview link below to anyone who is remotely interested in rock and roll in the fifties. From the street level, you might say: